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Photo of the Week

Macy's Garage, Ltd.

America's BEST Triumph Shop!

 

 

 

June 12, 2017

It is quite common for the lower breast plate on a TR4A-TR6 frame to be pushed "up" from someone in the past driving over a curb, parking block, speed bump, etc.  The space in this area is tight enough for the exhaust system to pass through without the previous modification, and when installing a new exhaust system we don't want it to bang on the frame.  The solution is to open the space back up by prying the bent breast plate back down into a more correct position.  To do this, we use our "Porta-Power" hydraulic ram and a set of jaws that open under pressure.  While most of you won't have one of these in your home garages, they can be rented from a good tool rental company, and it's well worth the time and cost to do so if your frame had been pushed up.

 

June 3, 2017
The dual chamber master cylinders for the TR250-TR6 models are hard to bleed all of the air out when they are installed on the car, because the master cylinders mount with a slight "Upward" slope to the front.  This allows a small amount of air to become trapped at the forward end of the cylinder, and causes a "spongy" feel to the brake pedal.

The trick to get all of the air out, is to bleed the master cylinder in a horizontal position, such as can be seen here where we have clamped it into a bench vise.  But when doing this, you have to be sure that you aren't sucking any air back into the chambers on the return strokes.  Probably the most common method to "bench bleed" a master cylinder would be to squirt brake fluid all over your workshop on the down stroke, and quickly hold a couple of fingers over the line ports during the return stroke.  Better have an extra set of hands for this method, both to perform the bench bleed, and to clean up the mess when you're done!

What we came up with quite a few years ago, was this special set of pipes to route the expelled fluid and air back into the reservoir.  Make sure that the ends are submerged in the fluid at all times so that the air bubbles can escape to the atmosphere, and only fluid will be drawn back into the chambers on the return stroke.  One person can achieve 100% evacuation of the air in the chambers, and there won't be a big mess to clean up either!  the tiny amount of air that might enter the fitting area when the cylinder is installed will simply be pushed out through the brake lines, and can then be bled out at the wheels like a normal brake bleed procedure.

 

May 19, 2017

"I wish you were closer", and I wish I had $5 for every time I've heard this!  It means that someone is just about to make a mistake and send their TR or TR components to someone farther down the food chain (or already has), and made their choice based more on geography than competence. 

While we wouldn't expect anyone to ship a Triumph to us for a simple oil change, the fact of the matter is that for more extensive needs, it's actually less costly in the long run to pay the shipping and have the work performed correctly the first time!

Just this week, we received TWO shipments from California, and these projects are on top of the TWO TR's that are already here from CA for complete frame up restorations, not to mention all the previous West Coast cars that have passed through our shop.  Folks who chose a shop due to location do not get any sympathy from me when the project goes wrong or they don't like the results!

Shipping cars and large components back and forth across the country is really easy, and less costly than you might think.  There are thousands of trucks and trailers on the road every day, moving collector cars and bulky car parts, and finding someone to bring your TR or TR parts here is as simple as visiting movecars.com or uship.com.  It really isn't a major expense when you consider our low midwestern shop rates AND the value of our highest level of quality.

The crate shown above on the left contains the engine and gearbox from Curt's TR3A, and the two TR3A's shown directly above are from Eric.  Added to the TR's we get here from all over the USA, Canada, and Mexico (16-20 at all times), we really are THE North American Center for the repair and restoration of Triumph TR2-TR6 sports cars, and we're closer and easier to get to than you might think!