Macy’s Garage
© 2019 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog  

   WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

April 22, 2019

Over the years, many folks have worked on these cars who have little to offer in the common sense department.  Take for example the person who installed this Ford style starter relay on this TR4, and left the bare steel choke cable running within a quarter of an inch above the hot battery terminal, and without a stitch of insulation to keep the two from making contact!  With the proper Lucas style relay, the hot battery terminal is moved farther away, making accidental contact unlikely. Thankfully the two never did touch and burn the car to the ground, but the choke cable moved around enough when pulled that it scared the crap out of most of the guys here.  A few more years and a little more deterioration of the choke cable grommet, and we might have had one less TR4 in the world!  And can you imagine if the carburetors were being removed so the cable was free to move around?  There would have certainly been a big fire when the sparks met up with the gasoline which always spills when carbs are pulled! The competent team here at Macy’s Garage always looks beyond the “just make it work” mentality that often prevailed when these cars were serviced during the past several decades, and we always keep our eyes focused well beyond that bare bones functionality viewpoint. April 15, 2019 Those of you who are members of the Triumph Register of America (TRA) will no doubt enjoy the “tech” article regarding the disassembly of rear axle hubs in the most recent club newsletter.  (Those of who own 4 cylinder TR’s and don’t belong to TRA, you really should!)  The theme of the article is that these hubs are very difficult to remove from the axles to replace bearings and hub seals, an almost impossible task with huge hydraulic presses at commercial establishments.  But we’ve also seen many hubs that were bent by a heavy press, and that’s why we have a proper puller and do all of the removal and reassembly here in our own shop. Quite a few TR owners have discovered that it is easier to stick their axles in a box and ship them off to Macy’s Garage to have the bearings and seals replaced correctly, than to run around their local town and find someone with a 100 ton + press, and then give them the opportunity to ruin their hubs.  The UPS driver usually brings us a set of these at least once a month, and just like the axles in the photo here, we’ll have them on the way back in a day or two.

April 8, 2019

There once was a time when TR owners couldn’t find parts or competent folks to repair their cars, so they were parked with the idea that “some day” they would be able to drive their precious Triumph again.  The parts situation has improved over the past couple of decades, but the mechanic problem has only gotten worse for those of you who still insist on finding a local “wrench” to service your car.  Those in the know will ship their cars and components to us to be properly repaired by people who work on nothing else, and as a result of this we get to see plenty of the failures that disabled so many TR’s in the past. What you see in this photo is a rear thrust washer from a TR4 gearbox, and the remains of the rear bearing inside of the 1st/reverse countershaft gear.  Not only did this failure ruin the bearing, thrust washer, and the countershaft itself, but it spun the thrust washer which destroyed the gearbox case.  This is a common failure with the 4-synchro gearboxes, and fortunately for the owner of this mess we did have a spare case in stock to get it back together quickly.  We keep a huge inventory on hand for situations like this, but all of our used parts are reserved for use in our shop, and we almost never sell a used part outside of our own projects.

April 1, 2019

It’s always a special day here when we are able to marry a freshly painted body tub onto a completely restored chassis.  We always have our restorations together and apart multiple times throughout the process, but the final time is always a treat.  From here forward, every part which goes onto the car will be there to stay, and it’s great fun to watch a fully restored TR appear before our eyes. The term most often used is a “Frame-Up” restoration, so most home restorers (and many “professional” shops) start by restoring the frame and suspension, and save the bodywork and paint until last.  But the paint and bodywork phase creates a huge amount of dust and dirt, making a great big mess on top of any freshly restored chassis.  For this reason, we wait to restore the frame and suspension until the body is ready to roll into the paint booth.  The body tub gets painted on a dolly, while the chassis moves to another area of our shop to be restored.  We’ll completely finish the chassis, put the engine and gearbox in place, with the exhaust and all of the brake lines run before the body is set in place for the final time.
  BLOG 2019-Q2
America’s BEST Triumph Shop
Macy’s Garage
© 2019 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog  

   WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

April 22, 2019

Over the years, many folks have worked on these cars who have little to offer in the common sense department.  Take for example the person who installed this Ford style starter relay on this TR4, and left the bare steel choke cable running within a quarter of an inch above the hot battery terminal, and without a stitch of insulation to keep the two from making contact!  With the proper Lucas style relay, the hot battery terminal is moved farther away, making accidental contact unlikely. Thankfully the two never did touch and burn the car to the ground, but the choke cable moved around enough when pulled that it scared the crap out of most of the guys here.  A few more years and a little more deterioration of the choke cable grommet, and we might have had one less TR4 in the world!  And can you imagine if the carburetors were being removed so the cable was free to move around?  There would have certainly been a big fire when the sparks met up with the gasoline which always spills when carbs are pulled! The competent team here at Macy’s Garage always looks beyond the “just make it work” mentality that often prevailed when these cars were serviced during the past several decades, and we always keep our eyes focused well beyond that bare bones functionality viewpoint.

April 15, 2019

Those of you who are members of the Triumph Register of America (TRA) will no doubt enjoy the “tech” article regarding the disassembly of rear axle hubs in the most recent club newsletter.  (Those of who own 4 cylinder TR’s and don’t belong to TRA, you really should!)  The theme of the article is that these hubs are very difficult to remove from the axles to replace bearings and hub seals, an almost impossible task with huge hydraulic presses at commercial establishments.  But we’ve also seen many hubs that were bent by a heavy press, and that’s why we have a proper puller and do all of the removal and reassembly here in our own shop. Quite a few TR owners have discovered that it is easier to stick their axles in a box and ship them off to Macy’s Garage to have the bearings and seals replaced correctly, than to run around their local town and find someone with a 100 ton + press, and then give them the opportunity to ruin their hubs.  The UPS driver usually brings us a set of these at least once a month, and just like the axles in the photo here, we’ll have them on the way back in a day or two.

April 8, 2019

There once was a time when TR owners couldn’t find parts or competent folks to repair their cars, so they were parked with the idea that “some day” they would be able to drive their precious Triumph again.  The parts situation has improved over the past couple of decades, but the mechanic problem has only gotten worse for those of you who still insist on finding a local “wrench” to service your car.  Those in the know will ship their cars and components to us to be properly repaired by people who work on nothing else, and as a result of this we get to see plenty of the failures that disabled so many TR’s in the past. What you see in this photo is a rear thrust washer from a TR4 gearbox, and the remains of the rear bearing inside of the 1st/reverse countershaft gear.  Not only did this failure ruin the bearing, thrust washer, and the countershaft itself, but it spun the thrust washer which destroyed the gearbox case.  This is a common failure with the 4-synchro gearboxes, and fortunately for the owner of this mess we did have a spare case in stock to get it back together quickly.  We keep a huge inventory on hand for situations like this, but all of our used parts are reserved for use in our shop, and we almost never sell a used part outside of our own projects.

April 1, 2019

It’s always a special day here when we are able to marry a freshly painted body tub onto a completely restored chassis.  We always have our restorations together and apart multiple times throughout the process, but the final time is always a treat.  From here forward, every part which goes onto the car will be there to stay, and it’s great fun to watch a fully restored TR appear before our eyes. The term most often used is a “Frame-Up” restoration, so most home restorers (and many “professional” shops) start by restoring the frame and suspension, and save the bodywork and paint until last.  But the paint and bodywork phase creates a huge amount of dust and dirt, making a great big mess on top of any freshly restored chassis.  For this reason, we wait to restore the frame and suspension until the body is ready to roll into the paint booth.  The body tub gets painted on a dolly, while the chassis moves to another area of our shop to be restored.  We’ll completely finish the chassis, put the engine and gearbox in place, with the exhaust and all of the brake lines run before the body is set in place for the final time.
America’s BEST Triumph Shop