Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2021 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog

WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

July 19, 2021

We see a large number of TR’s here that were parked for one reason or another, and then allowed to sit for a number of years before the owners decided they’d like to drive them again. While parking a car safely in a dry garage is better than leaving it in the back yard under a tarp or totally exposed in a field, allowing any car to sit anywhere for a lengthy period of time doesn’t ever do it any good. Unbelievable as it may seem, it’s always the fluids and the systems they work in that tend to spoil first, and gasoline is the worst of the bunch. While it’s pretty easy to pop open a gas cap and smell the nasty gasoline, getting a car back up and running reliably again is more involved than simply draining the tank and pouring in some fresh gas. Here we see a TR3A carburetor that’s had the bowl top removed, and you can see the residue that was left behind when the gas evaporated while sitting for a couple of years. Now some of the finer grit might have made it’s way through the fuel system and was already here before the lengthy storage, and it could have been the reason that the car was parked in the first place. However it got here, now that the varnish component of the old fuel has glued it all together, nothing short of a complete carburetor rebuild, along with a new fuel pump and thorough cleaning of the tank and lines will ever return this car to reliable operation. Then we’ll have to move on to the hydraulic and cooling systems!

July 12, 2021

Forming or re-forming sheet metal might not seem like a delicate process considering all of the hammering and grinding involved, but once the metal is close to the desired shape, the finesse part of the process comes into play. What we have going on here is that little studs have been welded to the door skin using a special piece of equipment which is obviously called a stud welder. Now most folks who even have one of these only use it to attach a slide hammer and pull out dents, but a true craftsman knows that applying a tiny amount of heat with pinpoint accuracy is a perfect way to shrink high spots. Stretched metal will naturally gather up and shrink down as it cools, and controlling the heat to shrink the metal just enough is always a challenge. After the cooling and shrinking process has occurred, the studs are bent over and snapped off, leaving just a tiny point that is easily ground away for a smooth surface. This procedure usually must be repeated several times to shrink a severely stretched panel, but it’s still a better option than beating the high spot down with a hammer and filling it back up with bondo (sometimes referred to as “cave it and pave it”). While that may work in the short run, it won’t be a repair that continues to look perfect for very long into the future.

July 5, 2021

Like a nightmare that never ends, this is the block from the problematic TR6 engine shown here in our blog on May 24 and June 28. We sent the block, crank, pistons and rods to our machine shop, and after just a preliminary cleaning they called with the bad news. We noted early on that this “rebuilt” engine was filthy inside and out, and had Mr. Famous race car engine builder bothered to clean the block, this crack should have been discovered a very long time ago. Being able to see the crack was enough to raise suspicions, and simply spraying the crack with carburetor cleaner and watching it appear on the inside was all it took to confirm the worst. No high tech testing was required, just old school simplicity. If there’s a silver lining in this for the owner, it’s the fact that he brought this mess here to be straightened out. We keep a large inventory of used parts on hand that are reserved strictly to support our own shop projects, so we didn’t have to start a nationwide search for a replacement block and then have it shipped here and hope it would be OK. We simply pulled a late TR6 engine block from our 9000 sq. ft. warehouse, and the very next day our machine shop was back to work.
BLOG 2021-Q3
America’s BEST Triumph Shop
Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2021 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog

WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

July 19, 2021

We see a large number of TR’s here that were parked for one reason or another, and then allowed to sit for a number of years before the owners decided they’d like to drive them again. While parking a car safely in a dry garage is better than leaving it in the back yard under a tarp or totally exposed in a field, allowing any car to sit anywhere for a lengthy period of time doesn’t ever do it any good. Unbelievable as it may seem, it’s always the fluids and the systems they work in that tend to spoil first, and gasoline is the worst of the bunch. While it’s pretty easy to pop open a gas cap and smell the nasty gasoline, getting a car back up and running reliably again is more involved than simply draining the tank and pouring in some fresh gas. Here we see a TR3A carburetor that’s had the bowl top removed, and you can see the residue that was left behind when the gas evaporated while sitting for a couple of years. Now some of the finer grit might have made it’s way through the fuel system and was already here before the lengthy storage, and it could have been the reason that the car was parked in the first place. However it got here, now that the varnish component of the old fuel has glued it all together, nothing short of a complete carburetor rebuild, along with a new fuel pump and thorough cleaning of the tank and lines will ever return this car to reliable operation. Then we’ll have to move on to the hydraulic and cooling systems!

July 12, 2021

Forming or re-forming sheet metal might not seem like a delicate process considering all of the hammering and grinding involved, but once the metal is close to the desired shape, the finesse part of the process comes into play. What we have going on here is that little studs have been welded to the door skin using a special piece of equipment which is obviously called a stud welder. Now most folks who even have one of these only use it to attach a slide hammer and pull out dents, but a true craftsman knows that applying a tiny amount of heat with pinpoint accuracy is a perfect way to shrink high spots. Stretched metal will naturally gather up and shrink down as it cools, and controlling the heat to shrink the metal just enough is always a challenge. After the cooling and shrinking process has occurred, the studs are bent over and snapped off, leaving just a tiny point that is easily ground away for a smooth surface. This procedure usually must be repeated several times to shrink a severely stretched panel, but it’s still a better option than beating the high spot down with a hammer and filling it back up with bondo (sometimes referred to as “cave it and pave it”). While that may work in the short run, it won’t be a repair that continues to look perfect for very long into the future.

July 5, 2021

Like a nightmare that never ends, this is the block from the problematic TR6 engine shown here in our blog on May 24 and June 28. We sent the block, crank, pistons and rods to our machine shop, and after just a preliminary cleaning they called with the bad news. We noted early on that this “rebuilt” engine was filthy inside and out, and had Mr. Famous race car engine builder bothered to clean the block, this crack should have been discovered a very long time ago. Being able to see the crack was enough to raise suspicions, and simply spraying the crack with carburetor cleaner and watching it appear on the inside was all it took to confirm the worst. No high tech testing was required, just old school simplicity. If there’s a silver lining in this for the owner, it’s the fact that he brought this mess here to be straightened out. We keep a large inventory of used parts on hand that are reserved strictly to support our own shop projects, so we didn’t have to start a nationwide search for a replacement block and then have it shipped here and hope it would be OK. We simply pulled a late TR6 engine block from our 9000 sq. ft. warehouse, and the very next day our machine shop was back to work.
America’s BEST Triumph Shop