Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2020 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog  

   WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

October 19, 2020

Hey, look at me in Dad’s TR3!  It’s never too late to start educating the next generation of car guys, is it?  Here we see Grayson Higbee (3 mos) trying out the driver’s seat of his Dad’s TR3A.  He’s having a little trouble reaching the pedals and seeing over the steering wheel, but it’s obvious he’s having a good time, none the less.  Daddy will need to find a good hiding place for the keys, and hopefully it will take awhile before Grayson learns how to “Hot Wire” a Triumph.  And there will be plenty of TR’s for him to cut his teeth on too, because his father Austin is the General Manager here at Macy’s Garage. I have been involved with the “Old Car Hobby” since I was just about Grayson’s age, and over the past several decades the one thing that has remained constant is the concern over the “graying” of the hobby.  All the old timers are worried that the younger generation isn’t interested in cars, and perhaps they are partly to blame for constantly telling the youngsters to “Look but DON’T Touch”.  Our GM Austin is only 28, and I knew he “got it” when I first interviewed him 10 years ago.  The story about taking HIS father’s lawn mower apart at age 6 to see how it  worked was a dead giveaway!  No one remembers if the mower ever worked again, but the “Car Guy” seeds must be planted early, and it looks like Grayson is off to a good start.

October 12, 2020

If I’ve said this once, I’ve said it 100 times;  Triumph built a pretty good car, which is why so many still exist today.  Yet some guys still feel the need to “improve” their cars when they only plan to drive them to the local Cars & Coffee one Saturday each month.  Can the original lever arm shocks really be as bad as all the internet chatter?  If you need to “tune” your shocks to lower your lap times at a track, then by all means, have at it!  But for a street car, there are plenty of other places to spend your money.  Don’t waste it to modify your car so that another modification is needed to make it work!  This TR6 chassis was restored by the owner, with us handling the remainder of the restoration.  He had not installed the rear shocks in the chassis before the car was mocked-up in our metal shop, so we did not know about this interference trouble until after the car was painted and going back together.  We cut relief holes in the rear floor and fabricated covers for clearance, but if these new shocks ever need to be changed, the body will have to come off of the frame or the rear suspension will have to be stripped away to get them out.  Not a well thought out “improvement” in my book!

October 5, 2020

Many times, when a rusty or crashed TR body panel has been “repaired” in the past, we find that we are better off removing the botched repair and creating an entirely new section from scratch.  Take the rear corner of this TR6 rear fender for example:  Numerous small patches had been brazed over the top of rust perforated metal, and someone really flowed the brass in there with their torch.  No way this was ever coming apart, and it had started to rust again around the edges.  We cut all of this mess away, and then re-formed the shape with a few pieces of stiff welding wire, the framework of which can be seen in the photo.  Once the skeleton was firmly in place, it was easy for our talented metal fabricator to form the sheet metal pieces that were TIG welded together to create another invisible Macy’s Garage repair.
  BLOG 2020-Q4
America’s BEST Triumph Shop
Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2020 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog  

   WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

October 19, 2020

Hey, look at me in Dad’s TR3!  It’s never too late to start educating the next generation of car guys, is it?  Here we see Grayson Higbee (3 mos) trying out the driver’s seat of his Dad’s TR3A.  He’s having a little trouble reaching the pedals and seeing over the steering wheel, but it’s obvious he’s having a good time, none the less.  Daddy will need to find a good hiding place for the keys, and hopefully it will take awhile before Grayson learns how to “Hot Wire” a Triumph.  And there will be plenty of TR’s for him to cut his teeth on too, because his father Austin is the General Manager here at Macy’s Garage. I have been involved with the “Old Car Hobby” since I was just about Grayson’s age, and over the past several decades the one thing that has remained constant is the concern over the “graying” of the hobby.  All the old timers are worried that the younger generation isn’t interested in cars, and perhaps they are partly to blame for constantly telling the youngsters to “Look but DON’T Touch”.  Our GM Austin is only 28, and I knew he “got it” when I first interviewed him 10 years ago.  The story about taking HIS father’s lawn mower apart at age 6 to see how it  worked was a dead giveaway!  No one remembers if the mower ever worked again, but the “Car Guy” seeds must be planted early, and it looks like Grayson is off to a good start.

October 12, 2020

If I’ve said this once, I’ve said it 100 times;  Triumph built a pretty good car, which is why so many still exist today.  Yet some guys still feel the need to “improve” their cars when they only plan to drive them to the local Cars & Coffee one Saturday each month.  Can the original lever arm shocks really be as bad as all the internet chatter?  If you need to “tune” your shocks to lower your lap times at a track, then by all means, have at it!  But for a street car, there are plenty of other places to spend your money.  Don’t waste it to modify your car so that another modification is needed to make it work!  This TR6 chassis was restored by the owner, with us handling the remainder of the restoration.  He had not installed the rear shocks in the chassis before the car was mocked-up in our metal shop, so we did not know about this interference trouble until after the car was painted and going back together.  We cut relief holes in the rear floor and fabricated covers for clearance, but if these new shocks ever need to be changed, the body will have to come off of the frame or the rear suspension will have to be stripped away to get them out.  Not a well thought out “improvement” in my book!

October 5, 2020

Many times, when a rusty or crashed TR body panel has been “repaired” in the past, we find that we are better off removing the botched repair and creating an entirely new section from scratch.  Take the rear corner of this TR6 rear fender for example:  Numerous small patches had been brazed over the top of rust perforated metal, and someone really flowed the brass in there with their torch.  No way this was ever coming apart, and it had started to rust again around the edges.  We cut all of this mess away, and then re-formed the shape with a few pieces of stiff welding wire, the framework of which can be seen in the photo.  Once the skeleton was firmly in place, it was easy for our talented metal fabricator to form the sheet metal pieces that were TIG welded together to create another invisible Macy’s Garage repair.
America’s BEST Triumph Shop