Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2022 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog

WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

January 30, 2023

This week we complete the TR6 dash repair trilogy. The photo shows the completed dash repair, proper square switch holes, and no remaining evidence of the hammer and chisel hack job that had been performed at some time in the distant past. We do realize that this area will never be seen once the wood overlay and switches are in place. However, our goal is always to make repairs that are undetectable, either when viewing the assembled car or should anyone ever need to disassemble it again. We often amuse ourselves when looking at previous “repairs” and modifications, and ask with a smirk, “why did they do that?”. We do not intend to ever be the butt of a joke or a source of amusement to anyone at any time in the future. We always strive to actually RESTORE the whole car back to original condition, not just the parts that will be easily seen. We’ll get our Triumphs as close to original as possible, even if we happen to make them a little better than factory in the process. And if the owner requests a modification or change, we’ll do that too, but to a high standard that doesn’t involve hammers and chisels!

January 23, 2023

The best fix for a mess like we showed you last week is the nuclear option and start over from ground zero. First we created a patch to fit tightly in the butchered hole and tacked it into position. From here we TIG welded the seams completely from the back side and ground the welds smooth. Now with a solid panel to work from and no holes in the damaged location, we were able to create a pattern from one of several undamaged dash panels here and mark out the locations for two new holes. From that point, cutting two rectangular holes in the proper locations with a mini cut-off wheel and a Dremel tool was a relatively simple task. We also opened them up a bit to accept the new larger switches while we were at it! A BIG part of the efficiency we bring to Triumph restorations is having been here many times before, and knowing how to head off future problems well in advance of occurrence!

January 16, 2023

We have here today the left end of a TR6 dash panel. You normally would never get to see this because it is covered by the wood overlay and lower crash pads along the bottom edge. What isn’t right is the oddly shaped hole running vertically between the two round holes. Originally this would have been two separate holes, both being perfect rectangles for wiper and washer switches in 1969-1972, and the same rectangular switch on top for the lighting switch and an oddly shaped bottom hole for the round wiper switch and wiper warning lamp at the bottom. We have no idea why someone would have needed to crudely chop away at this metal at some point during the past 50 years, but what’s done is done so now we’ll have to fix it. I will mention at this time that some of the new reproduction wiper and light switches are slightly wider, and a small amount of metal will need to be filed away from the sides of these holes to make the new switches fit, but the modification is minimal and you’ll hopefully do a nicer job than what was previously done to this panel!

January 9, 2023

Last week we were looking at the seam where rear fenders meet the body tub on TR4-TR6 cars, and I mentioned the “quickie “ repairs made years ago which won’t last forever. No sooner had I posted last week’s Blog than we started the disassembly of this TR6, which provides an excellent example. A metal patch has been brazed over a rusty section of the rear deck along the seam line. No doubt this was intended to keep the Bondo from falling through the hole until it hardened. You can see that the Bondo eventually cracked and peeled off, leaving this area in need of yet more repair work. In fact, in going over this car at the start of a complete frame-up restoration, it is the re-work of prior bad repairs that is going to give us the most trouble. The brazed patch in this location (and the opposite side) isn’t the worst of it, because Mr. Torch the brazing expert had filled the seams with molten brass, probably expecting the liquid metal to run down into the rust holes between the body tub and fenders and “fill” the problem. What he actually did was to make the fenders and the body tub a single unit, which probably means the fenders will have to be destroyed beyond repair just to get them off of the car.

January 3, 2023

Every car and truck has a general area where they are most prone to rust. Lower front fender between the wheel opening and the front edge of the door is common, as well as the lower rear quarter panel behind the door and the rear wheel opening. On the TR4-TR6, it’s the upper seam where the rear fenders (wings) bolt on. While the shape and size of the rusty areas are always different from car to car, we know that we’ll always find trouble here. This is because Triumph assembled the bodies before painting, so this seam never received any paint or primer. Wet spray from the rear tires was always flung up into this seam, and any moisture added to bare steel will start nature’s rusting process. Add in winter road salt in the northern climates, and this spot is a rust disaster just waiting to happen, and very quickly in most cases. By now, all of these cars have had some type of quickie repair that holds up in proportion to the reduced use the cars see as collector items, but the only way to accomplish a permanent repair is to cut away all of the rust and weld in new metal as shown in the photo. These seams will be solidly welded before painting in pieces (prior to assembly) so that all bare metal can be covered.
BLOG 2023-Q1
America’s BEST Triumph Shop
Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2022 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog

WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

January 30, 2023

This week we complete the TR6 dash repair trilogy. The photo shows the completed dash repair, proper square switch holes, and no remaining evidence of the hammer and chisel hack job that had been performed at some time in the distant past. We do realize that this area will never be seen once the wood overlay and switches are in place. However, our goal is always to make repairs that are undetectable, either when viewing the assembled car or should anyone ever need to disassemble it again. We often amuse ourselves when looking at previous “repairs” and modifications, and ask with a smirk, “why did they do that?”. We do not intend to ever be the butt of a joke or a source of amusement to anyone at any time in the future. We always strive to actually RESTORE the whole car back to original condition, not just the parts that will be easily seen. We’ll get our Triumphs as close to original as possible, even if we happen to make them a little better than factory in the process. And if the owner requests a modification or change, we’ll do that too, but to a high standard that doesn’t involve hammers and chisels!

January 23, 2023

The best fix for a mess like we showed you last week is the nuclear option and start over from ground zero. First we created a patch to fit tightly in the butchered hole and tacked it into position. From here we TIG welded the seams completely from the back side and ground the welds smooth. Now with a solid panel to work from and no holes in the damaged location, we were able to create a pattern from one of several undamaged dash panels here and mark out the locations for two new holes. From that point, cutting two rectangular holes in the proper locations with a mini cut-off wheel and a Dremel tool was a relatively simple task. We also opened them up a bit to accept the new larger switches while we were at it! A BIG part of the efficiency we bring to Triumph restorations is having been here many times before, and knowing how to head off future problems well in advance of occurrence!

January 16, 2023

We have here today the left end of a TR6 dash panel. You normally would never get to see this because it is covered by the wood overlay and lower crash pads along the bottom edge. What isn’t right is the oddly shaped hole running vertically between the two round holes. Originally this would have been two separate holes, both being perfect rectangles for wiper and washer switches in 1969-1972, and the same rectangular switch on top for the lighting switch and an oddly shaped bottom hole for the round wiper switch and wiper warning lamp at the bottom. We have no idea why someone would have needed to crudely chop away at this metal at some point during the past 50 years, but what’s done is done so now we’ll have to fix it. I will mention at this time that some of the new reproduction wiper and light switches are slightly wider, and a small amount of metal will need to be filed away from the sides of these holes to make the new switches fit, but the modification is minimal and you’ll hopefully do a nicer job than what was previously done to this panel!

January 9, 2023

Last week we were looking at the seam where rear fenders meet the body tub on TR4-TR6 cars, and I mentioned the “quickie “ repairs made years ago which won’t last forever. No sooner had I posted last week’s Blog than we started the disassembly of this TR6, which provides an excellent example. A metal patch has been brazed over a rusty section of the rear deck along the seam line. No doubt this was intended to keep the Bondo from falling through the hole until it hardened. You can see that the Bondo eventually cracked and peeled off, leaving this area in need of yet more repair work. In fact, in going over this car at the start of a complete frame-up restoration, it is the re-work of prior bad repairs that is going to give us the most trouble. The brazed patch in this location (and the opposite side) isn’t the worst of it, because Mr. Torch the brazing expert had filled the seams with molten brass, probably expecting the liquid metal to run down into the rust holes between the body tub and fenders and “fill” the problem. What he actually did was to make the fenders and the body tub a single unit, which probably means the fenders will have to be destroyed beyond repair just to get them off of the car.

January 3, 2023

Every car and truck has a general area where they are most prone to rust. Lower front fender between the wheel opening and the front edge of the door is common, as well as the lower rear quarter panel behind the door and the rear wheel opening. On the TR4-TR6, it’s the upper seam where the rear fenders (wings) bolt on. While the shape and size of the rusty areas are always different from car to car, we know that we’ll always find trouble here. This is because Triumph assembled the bodies before painting, so this seam never received any paint or primer. Wet spray from the rear tires was always flung up into this seam, and any moisture added to bare steel will start nature’s rusting process. Add in winter road salt in the northern climates, and this spot is a rust disaster just waiting to happen, and very quickly in most cases. By now, all of these cars have had some type of quickie repair that holds up in proportion to the reduced use the cars see as collector items, but the only way to accomplish a permanent repair is to cut away all of the rust and weld in new metal as shown in the photo. These seams will be solidly welded before painting in pieces (prior to assembly) so that all bare metal can be covered.
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