Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2021 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog

WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

October 18, 2021

This week we see the completed repair from last week. If you didn’t know where to look, this repair would be completely invisible. There are still a few imperfections remaining, but they are small enough that they would fill with several coats of primer. To save time and cost to the owner, we will use a very tiny amount of filler to speed up the process, eliminating the need to spray primer and block sand multiple times. Today’s body filler products are 10x better than what was available 20+ years ago, and part of the bad reputation that fillers have also originates from poor application techniques way back when. All body fillers will shrink over time in proportion to their thickness. So when you have deep craters such as seen with the previous metal “repair”, thicker filler will be needed and shrinkage is increased. The best case scenario with filler shrinkage would be that you would see a wave around the filler location. Worst case would be that the filler would crack and fall out. If the back side isn’t welded in completely solid like this and moisture can get to it from the back side, falling out will be a certainty. While it is possible to perform the metalwork with such a precision that zero filler is required, doing so would be cost prohibitive. To work out the remaining 10% of the metal defects would add 90% to the total cost of the repair. Keep the filler extremely thin, and keep the $ in your wallet.

October 11, 2021

The TR2-TR6 cars that we restore are now between 45-68 years old, and a lot has happened to them before their arrival here. Much of what we do during the restoration process involves repairing work that was previously done to lower standards than what is considered to be high quality today. For example, take a look at the section of TR6 front fender that Matt is holding in his hand. The headlight area of these fenders is known to rust, but quite a few were also wadded up via collision with something that was not a TR6. The original “repair” looks like the scrunched metal was beaten back into a rough shape with a hammer, and then any punctures or rust holes were brazed closed with a welding torch. After the previous bodyman got it “close enough” with the hammer and torch, the next step would have been to slather on the bondo and sand to a final shape. Compare that to Matt’s surgical removal of the damaged metal, and the perfectly shaped replacement section which he created to fill the hole. Magnets hold it in position at this point. Next week we’ll show you the completed repair, after the new panel has been butt welded with a TIG welder and the welds ground smooth to make an invisible repair.

October 4, 2021

A well known morsel of generally accepted wisdom says that experience is the best teacher, and here’s a perfect example of that. Having done more than a hundred complete TR restorations, we learned a very long time ago that the time to start thinking about the interior installation is well before the paint goes onto the bodywork. Take this TR3 inner wheel arch for example. We know full well that these body panels are covered with a very thin layer of foam padding along the top edge only, and the vertical areas of the panel will only get thin vinyl applied directly to the primed or painted metal. Now the thin padding along the top will hide some small imperfections in the metal, but if the vinyl alone is glued down over small dents or bumps, and especially any small specks of weld splatter or dirt and debris, the thin vinyl layer will actually magnify the imperfections. Just as with painting over body panels that are less than perfect, you cannot apply vinyl upholstery materials over flaws unless you want them to stand out when the restoration is done. Armed with that knowledge, we bodywork and smooth the upholstered interior panels right along with the outer body panels, with an eye to the interior installation which will occur much later in the restoration process.
BLOG 2021-Q4
America’s BEST Triumph Shop
Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2021 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog

WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

October 18, 2021

This week we see the completed repair from last week. If you didn’t know where to look, this repair would be completely invisible. There are still a few imperfections remaining, but they are small enough that they would fill with several coats of primer. To save time and cost to the owner, we will use a very tiny amount of filler to speed up the process, eliminating the need to spray primer and block sand multiple times. Today’s body filler products are 10x better than what was available 20+ years ago, and part of the bad reputation that fillers have also originates from poor application techniques way back when. All body fillers will shrink over time in proportion to their thickness. So when you have deep craters as seen with the previous metal “repair”, thicker filler will be needed and shrinkage is increased. The best case scenario with filler shrinkage would be that you would see a wave around the filler location. Worst case would be that the filler would crack and fall out. If the back side isn’t welded in completely solid like this and moisture can get to it from the back side, falling out will be a certainty. While it is possible to perform the metalwork with such a precision that zero filler is required, doing so would be cost prohibitive. To work out the remaining 10% of the metal defects would add 90% to the total cost of the repair. Keep the filler extremely thin, and keep the $ in your wallet.

October 11, 2021

The TR2-TR6 cars that we restore are now between 45-68 years old, and a lot has happened to them before their arrival here. Much of what we do during the restoration process involves repairing work that was previously done to lower standards than what is considered to be high quality today. For example, take a look at the section of TR6 front fender that Matt is holding in his hand. The headlight area of these fenders is known to rust, but quite a few were also wadded up via collision with something that was not a TR6. The original “repair” looks like the scrunched metal was beaten back into a rough shape with a hammer, and then any punctures or rust holes were brazed closed with a welding torch. After the previous bodyman got it “close enough” with the hammer and torch, the next step would have been to slather on the bondo and sand to a final shape. Compare that to Matt’s surgical removal of the damaged metal, and the perfectly shaped replacement section which he created to fill the hole. Magnets hold it in position at this point. Next week we’ll show you the completed repair, after the new panel has been butt welded with a TIG welder and the welds ground smooth to make an invisible repair.

October 4, 2021

A well known morsel of generally accepted wisdom says that experience is the best teacher, and here’s a perfect example of that. Having done more than hundred complete TR restorations now, we learned a very long time ago that the time to start thinking about the interior installation is well before the paint goes onto the bodywork. Take this TR3 inner wheel arch for example. We know full well that these body panels are covered with a very thin layer of foam padding along the top edge only, and the vertical areas of the panel will only get thin vinyl applied directly to the primed or painted metal. Now the thin padding along the top will hide some small imperfections in the metal, but if the vinyl alone is glued down over small dents or bumps, and especially any small specks of weld splatter or other dirt and debris, the thin vinyl layer will actually magnify the imperfections. Just as with painting over body panels that are less than perfect, you cannot apply vinyl upholstery materials over flaws unless you want them to stand out when the restoration is done. Armed with that knowledge, we bodywork and smooth the upholstered interior panels right along with the outer body panels, with an eye to the interior installation which will occur much later in the restoration process.
America’s BEST Triumph Shop