Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2021 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog  

   WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

January 18, 2021

The lower rear corners on all TR2-TR3A trunk (boot) lids (pre-TS60,000) are notorious for rust, and if not repaired by folks who know why, these corners could be one of the first spots to start bubbling up later and spoil your fresh restoration.  Triumph spot welded the inner brace structure to the skin while all parts were bare steel, so there was never a chance to protect this area from moisture and stave off the inevitable rust.  We begin all of our restorations by chemically dipping to strip paint, bondo and rust, but chemicals cannot work their way into this hidden area.  You can also bet that neither sand nor soda blasting, nor that can of paint stripper you bought at the home center is going to get in there either!  Knowing the propensity for these corners to rust, we always go the extra mile and drill the spot welds to separate the brace from the skin.  This lets us clean and inspect the rusty metal, and replace any sections that are either completely rusted through or getting close to doing so.  While it’s apart, we’ll also treat the hidden metal with a weld-through primer to protect this area from rusting all over again.

January 11, 2021

Back on Nov. 16 and Nov. 23 (2020Q4), we showed you a similar view inside a TR3 engine that had “blown” a head gasket 25+ years ago, and subsequently seized up tight after sitting for all these years with water in the #1 cylinder.  This is the same engine, 5 weeks later, and the difference is like night and day!  We’ll be installing this engine in a TR3A that’s here for a complete frame-up restoration, and I’ll mention that the owners are planning to drive the car home to California when the restoration is complete.  This particular TR3A has a lengthy ownership history with the same family, and we are certain that it will continue to serve them well for the next several generations after we’ve worked our magic. There are still plenty of stories to be written about this car and the family members who cherish it, and we are extremely happy to play a big part in the chapter where this fun little car was brought back from the dead and given a new life.  If you have a TR that is overdue for some love, perhaps it’s time to give us a call and begin the next chapter of your own Triumph story.

January 4, 2021

We’ve been doing a pretty good job of repairing rusted and slightly bent frames here with hastily fabricated jigs and guides to suit each different frame needing attention.  But lately we’ve seen an increase in the number of frames that have a problem, so we decided to build a special frame table that would allow us to take precision measurements more quickly for comparison to the factory drawings.   The solution was a 975# slab of ¾” thick steel that was flat and true, mounted on top of a rigid steel frame and a set of very expensive locking wheels.  We drilled and tapped several strategic locations to accept mounting blocks that would elevate the frame a consistent distance above the surface, with provisions to clamp the frames down securely for repeatable measurements throughout the straightening and rust repair process. The first frame to be repaired on this new table came out perfect, and the body dropped back on like butter!
  BLOG 2021-Q1
America’s BEST Triumph Shop
Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2021 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog  

   WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

January 18, 2021

The lower rear corners on all TR2-TR3A trunk (boot) lids (pre-TS60,000) are notorious for rust, and if not repaired by folks who know why, these corners could be one of the first spots to start bubbling up later and spoil your fresh restoration.  Triumph spot welded the inner brace structure to the skin while all parts were bare steel, so there was never a chance to protect this area from moisture and stave off the inevitable rust.  We begin all of our restorations by chemically dipping to strip paint, bondo and rust, but chemicals cannot work their way into this hidden area.  You can also bet that neither sand nor soda blasting, nor that can of paint stripper you bought at the home center is going to get in there either!  Knowing the propensity for these corners to rust, we always go the extra mile and drill the spot welds to separate the brace from the skin.  This lets us clean and inspect the rusty metal, and replace any sections that are either completely rusted through or getting close to doing so.  While it’s apart, we’ll also treat the hidden metal with a weld-through primer to protect this area from rusting all over again.

January 11, 2021

Back on Nov. 16 and Nov. 23 (2020Q4), we showed you a similar view inside a TR3 engine that had “blown” a head gasket 25+ years ago, and subsequently seized up tight after sitting for all these years with water in the #1 cylinder.  This is the same engine, 5 weeks later, and the difference is like night and day!  We’ll be installing this engine in a TR3A that’s here for a complete frame-up restoration, and I’ll mention that the owners are planning to drive the car home to California when the restoration is complete.  This particular TR3A has a lengthy ownership history with the same family, and we are certain that it will continue to serve them well for the next several generations after we’ve worked our magic.  There are still plenty of stories to be written about this car and the family members who cherish it, and we are extremely happy to play a big part in the chapter where this fun little car was brought back from the dead and given a new life.  If you have a TR that is overdue for some love, perhaps it’s time to give us a call and begin the next chapter of your own Triumph story.

January 4, 2021

We’ve been doing a pretty good job of repairing rusted and slightly bent frames here with hastily fabricated jigs and guides to suit each different frame needing attention.  But lately we’ve seen an increase in the number of frames that have a problem, so we decided to build a special frame table that would allow us to take precision measurements more quickly for comparison to the factory drawings.  The solution was a 975# slab of ¾” thick steel that was flat and true, mounted on top of a rigid steel frame and a set of very expensive locking wheels.  We drilled and tapped several strategic locations to accept mounting blocks that would elevate the frame a consistent distance above the surface, with provisions to clamp the frames down securely for repeatable measurements throughout the straightening and rust repair process. The first frame to be repaired on this new table came out perfect, and the body dropped back on like butter!
America’s BEST Triumph Shop