Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2020 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog  

   WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

August 3, 2020

While pressure washing the body shop dust off of the restored chassis from last week’s photo, much of the owner applied black paint blew right off of several suspension components, as seen in this week’s photo.  We inquired as to what paint he had used, suspecting some generic black from the hardware store, and at first we were surprised to hear that he was using some highly advertised super-duper chassis black from one of the big automotive mail order places.  A little more digging, and we learned that he had primed the parts a few at a time, and then waited several months until all parts were primed before he sprayed the black.  Mystery solved!  Modern catalysed paints must be applied one right after another within a narrow time window, so that the different layers can chemically bond.  Waiting for several months allowed the primer to get so hard that the black would never be able to stick to it. The lesson to be learned here is that when dealing with modern chemicals, you simply MUST read and follow the instructions, even though that goes against a Man’s nature!

July 27, 2020

It is called a “frame-up” restoration, so you’re supposed to restore the frame and suspension first, right?  That’s how most home restorers and many pro shops will approach a restoration, but that’s not how we do it here, and one look at this photo will tell you why!  The owner of this TR6 had started the restoration at home, and first thing after disassembly he restored the complete chassis.  What he and others who have used this approach didn’t realize, is just what a mess the metalwork, bodywork, and paint processes will make on top of your freshly restored chassis.  We tried to protect his handiwork by wrapping as much as possible in plastic, but as you can see here, the fine dust has a way of working itself in where you don’t want it to go.  We prefer to keep the chassis intact until the body is ready to enter the paint booth, so that all of the panels are kept in alignment through the sanding and bodywork.  Then, when all of the sheetmetal is ready for paint, we’ll blow the car back apart and restore the chassis while the body tub rolls into the paint booth on a dolly.  After the paint is complete and sanded/buffed to a mirror finish, the painted and polished body is reunited with the freshly restored chassis, complete with the entire drivetrain and exhaust system already in place.

July 20, 2020

All of the rusty, perforated, and thin metal shown in last week’s photo was cut away, and then it was time to create a new patch.  We had to make this complicated section out of 3 different pieces, and tack weld them all into position.  Once all of the sections were tack welded and the shape of the fender was confirmed, everything was solidly TIG welded and the welds ground down to make this virtually invisible repair.  No overlapping pieces, and no cracks or small pockets to hold moisture.  Only a paper thin wipe of body filler will be needed to create a perfect repair which will halt the decay and last for many decades into the future.

July 13, 2020

Here we have the TR4 RF fender from last week, after the “Band-Aid” has been ripped off, and the scab it was hiding is none too pretty.  We’ve seen worse, but then again we never know just how bad things were before the “patch” was applied all those years ago.  The big square rust hole was left open, allowing moisture to enter the area and trap it there to accelerate the rusting process.  Notice the large area of lighter brown rust just below the square hole, and then look closely at the numerous small dark holes below that.  This is the place where water from above drained down, and was trapped in a small pocket, allowing the damage to keep feeding on itself.  Nothing was ever “fixed” here, only hidden from view and allowed to fester.  It’s prior “repairs” like this that make us insist on completely stripping any car that we will be painting here as part of a complete frame-up restoration.  We simply must find all of the hidden damage and repair it properly, so that it doesn’t bubble through in a few years and imply that we did a lousy paint job.

July 6, 2020

This photo shows the lower front corner of a TR4 RF fender.  We get to see plenty of these 1970’s style repairs when we have all of our restorations chemically stripped.  We always strip our cars to bare metal in part to reveal “patches” of this sort, where metal or some other substance was used as a backing for the filler which would always be smeared over the top.  As long as you can’t see it immediately after the paint is applied, we’re good to go, right?  Well, perhaps in the short run, but eventually rust that was just glossed over will return, just as cancer will do the same if your doctor doesn’t get it all out.  Check back next week, and we’ll post another photo showing the rot that was still growing below the “repair”.
  BLOG 2020-Q3
America’s BEST Triumph Shop
Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2020 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog  

   WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

August 3, 2020

While pressure washing the body shop dust off of the restored chassis from last week’s photo, much of the owner applied black paint blew right off of several suspension components, as seen in this week’s photo.  We inquired as to what paint he had used, suspecting some generic black from the hardware store, and at first we were surprised to hear that he was using some highly advertised super-duper chassis black from one of the big automotive mail order places.  A little more digging, and we learned that he had primed the parts a few at a time, and then waited several months until all parts were primed before he sprayed the black.  Mystery solved!  Modern catalysed paints must be applied one right after another within a narrow time window, so that the different layers can chemically bond.  Waiting for several months allowed the primer to get so hard that the black would never be able to stick to it. The lesson to be learned here is that when dealing with modern chemicals, you simply MUST read and follow the instructions, even though that goes against a Man’s nature!

July 27, 2020

It is called a “frame-up” restoration, so you’re supposed to restore the frame and suspension first, right?  That’s how most home restorers and many pro shops will approach a restoration, but that’s not how we do it here, and one look at this photo will tell you why!  The owner of this TR6 had started the restoration at home, and first thing after disassembly he restored the complete chassis.  What he and others who have used this approach didn’t realize, is just what a mess the metalwork, bodywork, and paint processes will make on top of your freshly restored chassis.  We tried to protect his handiwork by wrapping as much as possible in plastic, but as you can see here, the fine dust has a way of working itself in where you don’t want it to go.  We prefer to keep the chassis intact until the body is ready to enter the paint booth, so that all of the panels are kept in alignment through the sanding and bodywork.  Then, when all of the sheetmetal is ready for paint, we’ll blow the car back apart and restore the chassis while the body tub rolls into the paint booth on a dolly.  After the paint is complete and sanded/buffed to a mirror finish, the painted and polished body is reunited with the freshly restored chassis, complete with the entire drivetrain and exhaust system already in place.

July 20, 2020

All of the rusty, perforated, and thin metal shown in last week’s photo was cut away, and then it was time to create a new patch.  We had to make this complicated section out of 3 different pieces, and tack weld them all into position.  Once all of the sections were tack welded and the shape of the fender was confirmed, everything was solidly TIG welded and the welds ground down to make this virtually invisible repair.  No overlapping pieces, and no cracks or small pockets to hold moisture.  Only a paper thin wipe of body filler will be needed to create a perfect repair which will halt the decay and last for many decades into the future.

July 13, 2020

Here we have the TR4 RF fender from last week, after the “Band-Aid” has been ripped off, and the scab it was hiding is none too pretty.  We’ve seen worse, but then again we never know just how bad things were before the “patch” was applied all those years ago.  The big square rust hole was left open, allowing moisture to enter the area and trap it there to accelerate the rusting process.  Notice the large area of lighter brown rust just below the square hole, and then look closely at the numerous small dark holes below that.  This is the place where water from above drained down, and was trapped in a small pocket, allowing the damage to keep feeding on itself.  Nothing was ever “fixed” here, only hidden from view and allowed to fester.  It’s prior “repairs” like this that make us insist on completely stripping any car that we will be painting here as part of a complete frame-up restoration.  We simply must find all of the hidden damage and repair it properly, so that it doesn’t bubble through in a few years and imply that we did a lousy paint job.

July 6, 2020

This photo shows the lower front corner of a TR4 RF fender.  We get to see plenty of these 1970’s style repairs when we have all of our full restorations chemically stripped.  We always strip our cars to bare metal in part to reveal “patches” of this sort, where metal or some other substance was used as a backing for the filler which would always be smeared over the top.  As long as you can’t see it immediately after the paint is applied, we’re good to go, right?  Well, perhaps in the short run, but eventually rust that was just glossed over will return, just as cancer will do the same if your doctor doesn’t get it all out.  Check back next week, and we’ll post another photo showing the rot that was still growing below the “repair”.
America’s BEST Triumph Shop