Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2021 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog

WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

January 24, 2022

The intake and exhaust valves inside of your engine seal only by simple metal to metal contact, so the sealing surfaces of both the valve and the valve seat in the head must be perfect. They also must align perfectly, so that contact between the two is maintained 100 percent of the way around. You have no doubt heard of bent or burned valves causing engines to run rough or poorly (if at all), and it is the irregular contact caused by one of those two conditions which causes all of the trouble. These valves must seal and hold compression of approximately 150 PSI on the initial compression stroke, and who knows how much additional pressure is exerted when the fuel and air mixture explodes in the cylinder. Without a doubt, it is a substantial amount. You can see in this photo some of the irregular surface pits in this exhaust valve seat, and understand why the engine barely ran and would only pump up to 120# of static compression. Note that there are two types of compression checks, a static check where you hold a compression gauge in the spark plug hole and measure the initial push when the starter cranks and the piston rises. Then there’s a leak-down test, where you test how well the cylinder holds the compression after that initial push. Needless to say, this one leaked down rapidly!

January 17, 2022

When working with ancient parts and new reproduction bits, it’s never too early to begin test fitting. Who knows how many times this front apron has been bumped and beaten over the preceeding 65 years, so chances are very good that even an original grille isn’t going to fit as properly as it should in this opening. Now most of you (and many “professional” shops) will hope for the best and wait until the car is painted to fit or even order the new shiny parts, but that’s when the wheels will start to come off of the apple cart! Over the years, we’ve seen more than our share of stalled projects, many of them painted and “just needs to be re-assembled”. What should be the easiest and most pleasant part of the restoration is left sitting idle, as no one wants to reverse gears and re-do bodywork a second time so that the car will go back together. While some may think that we assemble and dissassemble too many times during a restoration, we fully believe in being prudent and avoiding rework at some point further down the process. So far (knock on wood), we’ve never had to go back and re-do bodywork and paint because a later installed part wouldn’t fit. Remember, “haste makes waste”.

January 10, 2022

We had to do some fancy cropping and rotation on this weeks’ photo to find the correct angle to show the problem, but it should be easy to pick-up on now. Among the lengthy list that arrived with this TR3A, was a complaint that the owner was having difficulty fitting a new convertible top. We’ve seen enough of these cars by now to quickly notice when something isn’t right, and at first glance it was obvious to us that the windshield frame was bent back and lower at the top left corner. Using a simple yardstick held flat along the edge and starting from the lower portion of the stanchion (but above where it starts to curve forward), we could easily see the stanchion falling back away from a straight line. When checking the right side stanchion, the yardstick stayed in contact with the post all the way to the top, confirming that the left stanchion was bent. While it might not look like much at the windshield, only falling back a quarter of an inch, by the time you extend the angle out to the rear of the car, the top was skewed off to the right side by an inch and a half. How do these stanchions get bent this way? By drivers pulling themselves up and out of the car using the windshield as a handle. So if you find yourself or your passengers grabbing the top of the windscreen when getting in or out of a sidescreen TR, STOP DOING THAT!

January 3, 2022

Two different types of lug nuts were used on the Triumph TR’s, the small/thin nut shown here is the style that is used to attach the splined hub for cars equipped with wire wheels. In order to clear the rear of the wire wheels, the nuts were purposely made small and thin, with a tapered edge on each side. The flat thick base of the splined hubs distributed the forces around the entire bolt circle, allowing such small nuts to do the job safely. For steel wheel cars, the forces are concentrated around the four small studs, so larger and thicker nuts were specified. Try to use a large nut on a wire wheel car, and the nuts will keep the wheels from seating correctly and running true. Install small wire wheel nuts onto steel wheels as shown here, and the nuts will slowly pull through the wheel and fail. This wheel is already ruined, as the areas around the nuts have worn very thin. Thankfully we caught this (and the other 3 as well) before complete failure caused an accident that would have been harmful to both the car and occupants.
BLOG 2022-Q1
America’s BEST Triumph Shop
Macy’s Garage
© 2018-2021 - Macy’s Garage, Ltd.

Blog

WHAT we’re doing, and HOW we’re doing it!

January 24, 2022

The intake and exhaust valves inside of your engine seal only by simple metal to metal contact, so the sealing surfaces of both the valve and the valve seat in the head must be perfect. They also must align perfectly, so that contact between the two is maintained 100 percent of the way around. You have no doubt heard of bent or burned valves causing engines to run rough or poorly (if at all), and it is the irregular contact caused by one of those two conditions which causes all of the trouble. These valves must seal and hold compression of approximately 150 PSI on the initial compression stroke, and who knows how much additional pressure is exerted when the fuel and air mixture explodes in the cylinder. Without a doubt, it is a substantial amount. You can see in this photo some of the irregular surface pits in this exhaust valve seat, and understand why the engine barely ran and would only pump up to 120# of static compression. Note that there are two types of compression checks, a static check where you hold a compression gauge in the spark plug hole and measure the initial push when the starter cranks and the piston rises. Then there’s a leak-down test, where you test how well the cylinder holds the compression after that initial push. Needless to say, this one leaked down rapidly!

January 17, 2022

When working with ancient parts and new reproduction bits, it’s never too early to begin test fitting. Who knows how many times this front apron has been bumped and beaten over the preceeding 65 years, so chances are very good that even an original grille isn’t going to fit as properly as it should in this opening. Now most of you (and many “professional” shops) will hope for the best and wait until the car is painted to fit or even order the new shiny parts, but that’s when the wheels will start to come off of the apple cart! Over the years, we’ve seen more than our share of stalled projects, many of them painted and “just needs to be re-assembled”. What should be the easiest and most pleasant part of the restoration is left sitting idle, as no one wants to reverse gears and re-do bodywork a second time so that the car will go back together. While some may think that we assemble and dissassemble too many times during a restoration, we fully believe in being prudent and avoiding rework at some point further down the process. So far (knock on wood), we’ve never had to go back and re-do bodywork and paint because a later installed part wouldn’t fit. Remember, “haste makes waste”.

January 10, 2022

We had to do some fancy cropping and rotation on this weeks’ photo to find the correct angle to show the problem, but it should be easy to pick-up on now. Among the lengthy list that arrived with this TR3A, was a complaint that the owner was having difficulty fitting a new convertible top. We’ve seen enough of these cars by now to quickly notice when something isn’t right, and at first glance it was obvious to us that the windshield frame was bent back and lower at the top left corner. Using a simple yardstick held flat along the edge and starting from the lower portion of the stanchion (but above where it starts to curve forward), we could easily see the stanchion falling back away from a straight line. When checking the right side stanchion, the yardstick stayed in contact with the post all the way to the top, confirming that the left stanchion was bent. While it might not look like much at the windshield, only falling back a quarter of an inch, by the time you extend the angle out to the rear of the car, the top was skewed off to the right side by an inch and a half. How do these stanchions get bent this way? By drivers pulling themselves up and out of the car using the windshield as a handle. So if you find yourself or your passengers grabbing the top of the windscreen when getting in or out of a sidescreen TR, STOP DOING THAT!

January 3, 2022

Two different types of lug nuts were used on the Triumph TR’s, the small/thin nut shown here is the style that is used to attach the splined hub for cars equipped with wire wheels. In order to clear the rear of the wire wheels, the nuts were purposely made small and thin, with a tapered edge on each side. The flat thick base of the splined hubs distributed the forces around the entire bolt circle, allowing such small nuts to do the job safely. For steel wheel cars, the forces are concentrated around the four small studs, so larger and thicker nuts were specified. Try to use a large nut on a wire wheel car, and the nuts will keep the wheels from seating correctly and running true. Install small wire wheel nuts onto steel wheels as shown here, and the nuts will slowly pull through the wheel and fail. This wheel is already ruined, as the areas around the nuts have worn very thin. Thankfully we caught this (and the other 3 as well) before complete failure caused an accident that would have been harmful to both the car and occupants.
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